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Standard Exercises for the Dynadjust

1. Supine Cervical Break: The “patient” is in supine position. The thrust is nearly straight lateral with slight anterior to posterior angle. Variations on this exercise would be lateral thrusts with a superior to inferior angle, or inferior to superior angle. The contact is the radial aspect of the index finger. Exercise tubing for the “indifferent” hand is used to simulate holding the weight of the head of the patient. Supine Cervical Break

2. Prone Cervical-Thoracic Thumb Move: The “patient” is prone. The thrust is in an oblique plane with a slight posterior to anterior angle. The contact is the anterior aspect of the thumb and radial aspect of the adjusting hand. Exercise tubing for the “indifferent” hand can be used to simulate stabilizing the head of the patient into slight rotation away from the side of the thrust. Prone Cervical-Thoracic Thumb Move

3. Prone Cervical-Thoracic Cross-Bilateral: The “patient” is prone. The thrust is nearly straight posterior to anterior. Variations can include slight superior to inferior angles, or slight inferior to superior angles. The contact is the pisiform process of the adjusting hand. Exercise tubing can be used to simulate stabilizing the head of the patient in slight rotation away from the side of the thrust. Prone Cervical-Thoracic Cross-Bilateral

4. Prone Thoracic: The “patient” is prone. The thrust can be straight posterior to anterior. To simulate inducing flexion, the thrust can be posterior to anterior with an inferior to superior angle. To simulate extension, the thrust can be posterior to anterior with a superior to inferior angle. To simulate inducing rotation in the thoracic segments, add approximately 30 to 30 degrees of rotation to the thrust simultaneously, between the queue to thrust, and the end of the thrust. Exercise both right and left rotation. Prone Thoracic

5. Supine Thoracic: The “patient” is supine. The thrust is a body drop. Variations can include simulating inducing flexion by using exercise tubing on the arm nearest the head of the patient, and thrusting almost straight anterior to posterior. To exercise for moving the thoracic segments in the different directions, simply modify the thrust by varying the angle of attack such as superior to inferior and inferior to superior. Pay particular attention to your stance to protect your own back. Supine Thoracic

6. Side Posture, Lumbar Rotation: The “Patient” is on their side, facing the doctor. The top leg is flexed at the knee and hip. The thrust is a body-drop combined with a thrust from the hand nearest the patient’s feet. The other hand is stabilizing the shoulders and helping to induce rotation. The contact is the lower chest of the doctor on the hip of the patient, and the pisiform of the inferior hand on the mammillary process of the lumbar segment closest to the doctor, just lateral to the spinous process. Exercise tubing can be utilized on the superior hand or wrist, to simulate the pressure on the shoulder of the patient. Side Posture, Lumbar Rotation

7. Side Posture, Sacroiliac Manipulation: Same postures as #6, except that the thrust is in a slightly oblique plane with the base of the Dynadjust instrument held in the indifferent hand. Side Posture, Sacroiliac Manipulation

8. Seated Thoracic Adjustment: The “Patient” is seated with arms folded over the upper chest. The doctor is behind the patient. The base of the instrument is held into the chest of the doctor with either a straight anterior to posterior thrust, or a slightly inferior to superior angle. The hand contact is a bilateral grasp of the top of the instrument, simulating holding the elbows of the patient. Seated Thoracic Adjustment

9. Seated Cervical Rotation From Front: The “Patient” is seated in front of the doctor. The thrust is in an oblique plane with a slight superior to inferior angle. This exercise is performed in two parts, using the instrument in each hand to simulate the different components of the thrust. (See superimposition video to understand the postures of this complex maneuver.) Seated Cervical Rotation From Front

10. Seated Cervical and First Rib From Behind: The “Patient” is seated and the doctor is behind. The adjusting contact is the radial aspect of the doctor’s hand. The “indifferent” hand is stabilizing the head and neck in slight lateral flexion toward the adjusting hand. The thrust is nearly straight lateral, or lateral and slightly superior to inferior for a first rib maneuver. Seated Cervical and First Rib From Behind

11. Pubic Symphisis Adjustment: The “Patient” is supine with both knees and hips flexed, The doctor is standing to one side of the table, near the knees of the patient. The adjusting contact is the palm of one hand on the medial aspect of the knee on the opposite side, and the other hand is grasping the knee closest to the doctor with the palm on the patella. The thrust is a combined push with one hand, and a pull with the other hand, in a straight lateral direction with both knees. This exercise is performed as two separate moves, as a pull, and push with the Dynadjust instrument, concentrating on a straight lateral motion, and with speed being the more important focus.

12. Lower Extremity Adjusting: These exercises are separated into their basic components, and performed as basic pull, and body drop maneuvers with the Dynadjust instrument. Use the heavier springs for realistic resistance settings, and deep tissue pull and thrust parameter settings.

 


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